Nanotech bandages become a reality

Note: A lovely GFL fan sent in this story, but now I can’t find who it was! Say so in the comments.

 

The cover of THE ALL-PRO, GFL Book III, showing blue nanotech bandages on the right hand of Quentin Barnes.

The hardcover cover of THE ALL-PRO, GFL Book III, showing blue nanotech bandages on the right hand of Quentin Barnes.

If only NFL players like J.J. Watt (pictured above) had access to GFL tech …

Blue nano-knit bandages are a huge part of the Galactic Football League series, and now it seems that this bit of science fiction might just be science fact. A team of Egyptian scientists from the Zewail City of Science and Technology claim to have developed a “bandage embedded with nanoparticles for the treatment of wounds using the anti-epilepsy drug Phenytoin, known for its capacity to treat skin injuries,” according to an article at SciDev.Net.

To quote the article directly, “The bandage can heal wounds in a few days, after just one application to soft tissue. Wounds normally take several days to a few weeks to heal completely, and some may only heal after several months or up to two years.”

In the GFL series, nano-knit bandages deliver microscopic machines into the bloodstream. The machines tear open a few thousand cells to read DNA to see how the body is supposed to be built, then repair the damage from the inside-out to meet that biological blueprint. When the micromachines have completed their work, they are excreted from the body, as specified in this little excerpt from GFL Book I, THE ROOKIE:

“But when do you take them out?”

“We don’t do anything with them, Quentin. Your body will process them out like any other waste. Kidneys will filter them.”

“So I’ll pee them out?”

“That is correct. Now if you’ll excuse me, I must see what other injuries require my attention.”

The real-world “nanotech bandage” uses Phenytoin, and anti-epilepsy drug that is also “known for its potential to accelerate wound healing.” The medicine is delivered as nanoparticles carried on nanofibers embedded in the bandage. Ibrahim M. El-Sherbiny, the director of the Center for Materials Science, is the person behind this invention.

No word as of yet if El-Sherbiny will challenge Doc Patah as the top medical officer of the Ionath Krakens organization.

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